Tern Sound Recordings Reading PA

Local resource for tern sound recordings in Reading, PA. Includes detailed information on local businesses that provide access to tern sound recordings, tern song recordings, and tern bird houses, as well as advice and content on attracting terns, tern feeders, tern types, and tern descriptions.

G & K Hobby Centre
(610) 374-8598
720 Gordon Street
Reading, PA
 
J C Musser Hobbies
(610) 921-8788
835 Hiesters Lane Suite 7 Post Office Box 14901
Reading, PA
 
Ye Old Train
(610) 369-0755
& Christmas Shop
Boyerstown, PA
 
Modellbahn Ott Hobbies
(610) 367-5925
1100 Grosser Road
Gilbertsville, PA
 
Survival Camping Store
(610) 301-2817
15623 kutztown road
kutztown, PA
Store Type
Camping and Survival Gear
Prices and/or Promotions
'Survival' gets 10% off!

Iron Horse Hobby House
(610) 373-6927
60 South Sixth St.
Reading, PA
 
HobbyTown USA
(610) 916-4477
12F Wingco Lane
Reading, PA
 
Modelport
(610) 323-6753
Inc. 309 High Street
Pottstown, PA
 
Brian's Model Trains
(717) 866-6070
109 W Main Street
Myerstown, PA
 
Leesport premium feed, pet supply & grooming
(610) 926-8228
RT 61 & WALL STREET
Leesport, PA

Data Provided By:
Data Provided By:

Caspian Tern

Caspian Tern

Photo by Jim McCormac.

Listen to a Caspian tern.

What to Look and Listen For

The gull-sized Caspian tern is no wallflower, and as befits its character, the bird is not shy about shouting out to the world. Around water bodies, listen for a harsh croaking yip a bit reminiscent of an upset terrier, sometimes stretched to a longer, drawn-out jee-arrrr!. Melodic these are not. The carrying power of Caspian tern calls is impressive, and you'll often hear the bird before you see it. Look in the direction of the raucous calls, and before long you'll see a bird with somewhat labored rowing strokes, looking every bit the match of a ring-billed gull in the size department. The black cap and downward-pointing, large red bill will soon become obvious.

When and Where to Look

Given how widely distributed and common Caspian terns are in North America, you generally don't have to go far to see them. Many breeding colonies are well known, and if you visit one that is viewable, you'll be assured hours of fascinating tern-watching. Migrants can turn up anywhere, especially east of the Mississippi River, and can be expected along any large river or lake. Harbors and shorelines along the Great Lakes are especially good places to find migrants.

The migratory peaks across much of North America tend to be April and May, and August and September. Many southbound adults are closely attended by juveniles, which are evident by their scalloped brownish back.

Caspian terns are common in winter along southern U.S. coasts, and it is an educational experience to see them loafing in mixed flocks with other tern species. Florida, Texas, and southern California offer wintertime birders plenty of Caspians.

Feeding Behavior

Watching Caspian terns feed is always entertaining. Like black-and-white avian kamikazes, they barrel into the water from as high as 90 feet, but usually from much lower. Hunting terns tend to trace languid circles, carefully...

Author: Bird Watcher's Digest

Copyright2010 Bird Watcher's Digest

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